UNIDO, SON SAY STANDARDISATION WILL ELIMINATE POVERTY, SUPPORT WOMEN’S RIGHTS

 

UNIDO, SON SAY STANDARDISATION WILL ELIMINATE POVERTY, SUPPORT WOMEN’S RIGHTS

20 June 2017 - Abuja, Nigeria

United Nations Industrial Development Organisation joined the Standards Organisation of Nigeria (SON) and other relevant public and private stakeholders in celebrating the fifth African Day of Standardisation (ADS), in Abuja. The ADS was initiated in 2013 by the African Organisation for Standardisation (ARSO) to promote standardisation and conformity assessment within the continent. The theme of the 2017 edition was “Role of Standardisation in Facilitating Human Rights with Particular Focus on the Rights of Women.”

In his welcome address, SON Director General/Chief Executive, Osita Anthony Aboloma, cited the role of standards in promoting women’s rights. “Women’s rights through standardisation should be seen from the perspective of the influence of standardisation on economic growth, productivity and the elimination of poverty in the society…in the context of promoting safe and quality products… market access …, equal opportunity, security, effective legislations and regulatory systems.”

UNIDO-NQIP Lead National Expert on Technical Regulations, Abimbola Uzomah, attended the event on behalf of UNIDO. In the goodwill message she presented, Ms. Uzomah highlighted UNIDO’s commitment to gender equality and the empowerment of women, stating that, “UNIDO supports national institutions and private sector that will advance gender equality and women’s economic empowerment, harnessing their potential as economic actors and leaders for sustainable industrial development and sustainable economic growth.”

Ms. Uzomah commended ARSO and SON on prioritising women’s interests in standardisation. She, however, noted that current global practices “fall short of expectations.”

“There is no consideration for the differences between male and female standard users, and no documentation about the gender impacts of standards. Consequent effects [are] felt in the high level of poverty and slow economic development. The appropriate entry-points for integrating gender perspectives in standards must be given adequate consideration.”

Ms. Uzomah advised that standards and regulations must be developed to represent the interests, needs, experiences and expectations of both men and women.

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